Today in LGBT History: September 16-October 10

Kelly and I are off to Europe, back in time for National Coming Out Day on October 11th.  Below please find your daily history through 10/11. Enjoy!

What to do today to resist: Go to 5calls.org for daily actions.


This Day in LGBT History – September 16

1730, Amsterdam – Navy Chief of Detectives Laurens Hospuijn (? – September 16, 1730) is executed for Sodomy in Amsterdam. He is executed by being strangled and thrown into the water with a 100-pound weight.

1994 – At the insistence of the U.S., the United Nations suspends the International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA) from observer status because of allegations that ILGA’s members include groups that promote pedophilia

1994 – Richard A. Heyman (1935 – September 16, 1994) dies. He was mayor of Key West, Florida from 1983 to 1985 and from 1987 to 1989. He was one of the first openly gay public officials in the United States. Under his leadership, the City of Key West passed a resolution to make it illegal for employers to fire staff who had HIV/AIDS. Heyman had a long-time partner, John Kiraly. He died of AIDS-related pneumonia on September 16, 1994 at 59 years old. His papers are held at the Cornell University Library in Ithaca, New York. The Richard A. Heyman Environmental Pollution Control Facility in Key West was named in his honor. In 2010, a documentary about Richard Heyman’s first term as mayor, directed by John Mikytuck, The Newcomer, was released.

2013 – Israeli couple, Yuval Topper-Erez, a transman, and his husband Matan, became the first to be jointly recognized as biological fathers

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 17

1480, Spain – The Spanish Inquisition is established as a court for the detection of heretics, although its true purpose remains somewhat obscure, but 1000-1600 people were charged with the crime of sodomy. During the 350 years of the Spanish Inquisition, the total number of “heretics” burned at the stake totaled nearly 32,000

1778 – Friedrich von Steuben (September 17, 1730 – November 28, 1794) arrives in Valley Forge to offer his expertise to the Continental Army. Von Steuben had been forced out of the Prussian military due to homosexual scandals. He is considered the father of the United States military. He was a gay man who wrote the “Revolutionary War Drill Manual” and introduced drills, tactics and discipline to the rag-tag militia, which resulted in victory over the British. He has a statue at Valley Forge and another in Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C. Towns, buildings and a college football field have been named after him; there is even an annual Steuben Day Parade held in his honor every September in cities such as New York and Chicago (in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Ferris lip syncs Wayne Newton’s “Danke Schoen” during Chicago’s Steuben Day Parade). No foreigner besides Marquis de Lafayette has been so adored in America as von Steuben. The one fact that seems to be left out is that von Steuben was known to “have affections to members of his own sex” and was even identified as a “sodomite,” which is rumored to be the reason he left Prussia for France where he ultimately met Ben Franklin. Upon arriving at Valley Forge, von Steuben was immediately accepted by Washington, who recognized his military genius. Steuben single-handedly turned a militia, consisting mostly of farmers, into a well-trained, disciplined and professional army that was able to stand musket-to-musket combat with the British. Washington and the Continental Army officially adopted von Steuben’s methods and renamed them Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United State, known in military circles today simply as “The Blue Book.”

1948 – Ruth Fulton Benedict (June 5, 1887 – September 17, 1948) dies. She was an American anthropologist and folklorist. Benedict held the post of President of the American Anthropological Association and was also a prominent member of the American Folklore Society. Benedict taught her first anthropology course at Barnard college in 1922 and among the students there was Margaret Mead. Benedict was a significant influence on Mead. She was a sometimes lover and lifelong friend of fellow anthropologist Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 – November 15, 1978). Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict are considered to be the two most influential and famous anthropologists of their time. One of the reasons Mead and Benedict got along well was because they both shared a passion for their work and they each felt a sense of pride at being a successful working woman during a time when this was uncommon. They were known to critique each other’s work frequently; they created a companionship that began through their work, but which also during the early period was of an erotic character. Both Benedict and Mead wanted to dislodge stereotypes about women during their time period and show that working women can be successful even though working society was seen as a man’s world. In her memoir about her parents, With a Daughter’s Eye, Margaret Mead’s daughter implies that the relationship between Benedict and Mead was partly sexual. In 1946, Benedict received the Achievement Award from the American Association of University Women. After Benedict died of a heart attack in 1948, Mead kept the legacy of Benedict’s work going by supervising projects that Benedict would have looked after, and editing and publishing notes from studies that Benedict had collected throughout her life

1972 – M*A*S*H premieres on CBS introducing the world to Cpl. Max Klinger, televisions first on-going heterosexual cross-dressing character.

1976, Canada – Toronto gay activist Brian Mossop is expelled from the Communist Party of Canada for being openly gay and advocating homosexuality.

1979 – California Governor Jerry Brown appoints Stephen M. Lachs (born September 1939) to the Los Angeles Superior Court making him the nation’s first openly gay judge. He retired from the L.A. County Superior Court in 1999.

2001 – Paul Holm, the partner of Flight 93 hero Mark Bingham (May 22, 1970 – September 11, 2001), is presented with the folded American flag.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 18

1911 – C.E. Frommel, 20, is sentence to prison for sodomy in Washington State. He is from Kittitas County, WA and employed as a steeple jack.

1980, Canada – The Toronto Board of Education adopts a policy banning discrimination based on sexual orientation while adding a clause forbidding “proselytizing of homosexuality in the schools.”

1981 – The film Mommie Dearest opens, simultaneously glorifying and condemning gay icon Joan Crawford.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 19

1551, France – Henri III (19 September 1551 – 2 August 1589) is born at Fontainebleu, France. He was the King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1573 to 1575 and King of France from 1574 until his death. He was the last French monarch of the House of Valois. Reports that Henry engaged in same sex relations with his court favorites, known as the mignons, date back to his own time. On August 1, 1589, Henry III lodged with his army at Saint-Cloud, and was preparing to attack Paris, when a young fanatical Dominican friar, Jacques Clément, carrying false papers, was granted access to deliver important documents to the king. The monk gave the king a bundle of papers and stated that he had a secret message to deliver. The king signaled for his attendants to step back for privacy, and Clément whispered in his ear while plunging a knife into his abdomen. Clément was then killed on the spot by the guards.

1964 – Organized by activist Randy Wicker ( born February 3, 1938), a small group picketed New York City’s Whitehall Street Induction Center after the confidentiality of gay men’s draft records was violated. Randy Wicker, Renee Cafiero, and other activists, and representatives of the New York League for Sexual Freedom picket the Whitehall Induction Center in protest of the Military’s anti-gay and -lesbian policies. This action has been identified as the first gay rights demonstration in the United States.

1970, Sydney, Australia – John Ware and Christabel Poll, founders of the newly formed Campaign Against Moral Persecution, Inc. (CAMP, Inc.) become the first gay man and the first lesbian, respectively, to come out in the country’s history when an interview featuring them is published in the newspaper The Australian.

1988 – Greg Louganis (born January 29, 1960) is injured during the Seoul Olympics. His head struck the springboard during the preliminary rounds, leading to a concussion. He completed the preliminaries despite his injury. He then earned the highest single score of the qualifying round for his next dive and repeated the dive during the finals, earning the gold medal by a margin of 25 points.

2003, Belize – Same-sex sexual activity is banned with a 10-year jail sentence if caught.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 20

365 BC – Birthday of Alexander the Great, King of Macedonia (356 BC—323 BC) is born. He was King of Macedonia and conqueror of the Persian Empire. He is considered one of the greatest military geniuses of all time. Alexander was born in 356 BC in Pella, the ancient capital of Macedonia. He was the son of Philip II, King of Macedonia, and Olympias, the princess of neighboring Epirus. Alexander spent his childhood watching his father transform Macedonia into a great military power, and watching him win victory after victory on the battlefields throughout the Balkans. Historians believe he was gay; the American Library Association’s list of GLBT historical figures includes Alexander the Great.

1890, Germany – Dr. Erwin Gohrbandt studied medicine at the Military Medical Academy and graduated in 1917. He worked at the Charité Universitätsmediz in in Berlin. He did the initial operations on the first two transsexuals to have modern surgery. In Berlin in 1931, Dora R, born as Rudolph R, became the first known transgender woman to undergo vaginoplasty. According to Dr. Felix Abraham, a psychiatrist working at the Institute for Sexual Science, where Dora is employed as a domestic servant, her “first step to feminization was made by means of castration” in 1922. “After this there was a long pause, until the beginning of the year 1931, when the penis amputation was done and in June, a highly experimental vaginoplasty was performed by Dr. Erwin Gohrbandt who later becomes a decorated surgeon-general in the Luftwaffe.

1917, France – Bisexual American painter Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 – December 7, 1970) had a three-year affair with Russian ballerina Ida Rubinstein  (September 21,1883 – September 20, 1960) and had painted portraits of her during that time. One was the “Weeping Venus “which was featured on this day at the opening of Expo Centre Pompidou Metz.

1971 – John Singer (October 21, 1944 – June 5, 2000), later known as Faygele ben Miriam, and fellow activist Paul Barwick (born 1946) apply for a marriage license in Seattle. Singer was a U.S. activist for LGBT rights, and a gay marriage pioneer, filing one of the first gay marriage lawsuits in American history after being denied a marriage license at the King County Administration Building in Seattle, Washington in 1971. The case, Singer v. Hara, was the best-known gay marriage case in the state of Washington until Andersen v. King County in 2006. Barwick served three years in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, working as a military policeman. Later, he became an emergency dispatcher for the Washington State Patrol, and attended Olympic College in Bremerton. He currently lives in San Francisco, California, his residence for the last 30 years

1973 – In their so-called “battle of the sexes,” tennis star Billie Jean King (born November 22, 1943) defeats Bobby Riggs in straight sets, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3, at the Houston Astrodome.

1958 – The New York chapter of Daughters of Bilitis is formed by a group of lesbians including Barbara Gittings. They meet at the offices of the Mattachine Society of New York. The chapter is the first lesbian organization on the East Coast

1980 – Bruce Mailman (1939-June 9, 1994) opens the Saint disco in New York City, heralding what many gay New Yorkers remember as the zenith of the clone era. He was an East Village entrepreneur, Off-Broadway theatre-owner and founder of The Saint and New St. Marks Baths. In 1979, he bought the building that would become the New Saint Marks Baths at 6 St. Marks Place. He sought to provide a cleaner environment for a gay bathhouse than had been the case prior. He claimed it was the largest bathhouse in the world. In 1981 he bought the neighboring 8 St. Marks with hopes of doubling the size. In 1980 he bought the Fillmore East and converted it to The Saint nightclub. Both institutions would run into trouble with the advent of the AIDS crisis. Mailman died of AIDS in 1994.

1996 – President Clinton announced his signing of a bill outlawing homosexual marriages, but said it should not be used as an excuse for discrimination, violence or intimidation against gays and lesbians.

1996, Saudi Arabia – Twenty-four Filipino workers receive the first 50 lashes of their 200-lash sentence for alleged “homosexual behavior.” Despite protests from Amnesty International, the government goes ahead with the sentence and later deports the workers.

2010, Peru –  LGBT activist Alberto Osorio was found murdered in his apartment in Lima. Eight similar crimes against LGBT individuals in Peru occurred in the same year.

2011 – The military’s Don’t’ Ask Don’t Tell policy is officially repealed. It had been in effect since 1993.

2013 –Cassidy Lynn Campbell, 16, becomes the first transgender public school homecoming queen in the U.S., at Marina High School in Huntington Beach, CA.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 21

1372, UK – King Edward II is killed (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327). The King was rumored to have had an affair with Hugh Despenser. Edward also had a close and controversial relationship with Piers Gaveston, who had joined his household in 1300. The precise nature of Edward and Gaveston’s relationship is uncertain; they may have been friends, lovers or sworn brothers.

1955 –  In San Francisco four lesbian couples, including Phyllis Lyon (born November 10, 1924) and Del Martin  (May 5, 1921 – August 27, 2008), found the Daughters of Bilitis, the first homophile organization exclusively for women. Forty-nine years later, Lyon and Martin would become the first same-sex couple ever to marry legally in the United States when San Francisco begins issuing licenses. Their marriage would be subsequently annulled by the California Supreme Court, along with more than 4,000 other couples’ marriages, in its ruling that Mayor Gavin Newsom was exceeding his authority by determining that it was unconstitutional to deny these couples marriage licenses. Then, on June 16, 2008, after 55 years in love, Lyon and Martin married again, legally:

1982 – The Oklahoma Supreme Court awards custody of two boys to their divorced gay father, declaring homosexuality isn’t in itself grounds for ruling a parent unfit.

1993 – Actress Amanda Bearse (born August 9, 1958) comes out while co-starring on the television series Married with Children.

1996 – President Bill Clinton signs the Defense of Marriage Act, banning federal recognition of same-sex marriage and defining marriage as “a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.”

1998 – “Will & Grace,” the first prime-time program to feature openly gay lead characters, premiers.

2003, Canada –Soldier’s Girl, a film based on a true story about solider in love with a transsexual woman, is nominated for an EMMY.

2009 – Openly transgender Michelle Poley wins an EMMY as part of the CNN Election Center team.

2010 – Dan Savage (born October 7, 1964) and husband Terry Miller uploads their first It Gets Better video on YouTube. Dan  is an American author, media pundit, journalist, and activist for the LGBT community. He writes Savage Love, an internationally syndicated relationship and sex advice column. In 2010, Savage and his husband, Terry Miller, began the It Gets Better Project to help prevent suicide among LGBT youth. He has also worked as a theater director, sometimes credited as Keenan Hollahan.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 22

1676 – Governor Edmond Andros of New York issues an order extending the 1665 sodomy law of New York into what is now Pennsylvania and Delaware

1928 – The Chicago Defender, one of the pre-eminent African American newspapers, runs an ad for a new record by Ma Rainey (1886-1939) called Prove It on Me Blues. The lyrics are unmistakably about women-loving-women

1975, Canada – Doug Wilson, a graduate student in education at University of Saskatchewan, is prevented from practice teaching in Saskatoon because he was publicly active in the gay movement. The president of the university calls it a “managerial decision.”

1975 – Oliver Sipple (November 20, 1941 – February 2, 1989), a gay man and former Marine and Vietnam veteran, prevents a gunshot fired by Sara Jane Moore from hitting President Gerald Ford, in San Francisco. The subsequent public revelation that Sipple was gay turned the news story into a cause célèbre for LGBT rights activists, leading Sipple to unsuccessfully sue several publishers for invasion of privacy.

2000 – The Backstreet Café in Roanoke, V.A. was attacked by a man named Ronald Gay who specifically said he was on a mission to kill gay people. The 55-year-old drifter opened fire at the bar killing one man, Danny Lee Overstreet, and wounding six others.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 23

1965, India – Indian prince Manavendra Singh Gohil (born September 23, 1965), believed to be the only openly gay royal in the world, was born. His family disowned him when he first came out in the media in 2006. He has since been welcomed back. The Prince is the founder of an HIV/AIDS prevention charity. He runs a charity, The Lakshya Trust, which works with the LGBT community.

1970 – Ani Difranco (born September 23, 1970) is born. She becomes an articulate, intelligent, out bisexual punk folksinger with her own record label, Righteous Babe Records, in an industry dominated by multinational corporations. She’s proud that she not only writes and publishes her own songs, but also produces her own recordings, creates the artwork, and releases them.

1970 – On the CBS Television series Medical Center, a medical researcher announces, “I am a homosexual.” Although his “condition” is portrayed as unfortunate, the program is acclaimed as the first sympathetic treatment of a gay man in an American TV drama.

1984 – First Folsom Street Fair takes place, organized by the San Francisco BDSM and Leather Fetish community.

1999 – First Celebrate Bisexuality Day, sponsored by BiNet, to recognize bisexuality, bi history, and the bi community.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 24

1482, Switzerland – Richard Puller von Hohenberg is burned at the stake along with his servant Anton Matzler in Zurich. They are accused of having a homosexual relationship.

1731, The Netherlands – Twenty-two men are strangled and burned in a mass execution in Zuidhorn under the charge of sodomy.

1981, Canada – In Toronto, a Provincial Court judge acquits Don Franco of charges of keeping a common bawdyhouse in his own home. Police had burst in on Franco while he was having a three-some in 1979.

1981, Canada – Out of the Closet: A Study of Relations Between The Homosexual Community and Police, commissioned by Toronto city council, is released by Arnold Bruner, the author of the report. It recognizes the gay community as legitimate part of community and calls for permanent police / gay dialogue committee.

1982 – The CDC defines a case of AIDS as a disease, at least moderately predictive of a defect in cell-mediated immunity, occurring in a person with no known cause for diminished resistance to that disease. Such diseases include KS, PCP, and other serious opportunistic infections. Diagnoses are considered to fit the case definition only if based on sufficiently reliable methods (generally histology or culture). Some patients who are considered AIDS cases on the basis of diseases only moderately predictive of cellular immunodeficiency may not actually be immunodeficient and may not be part of the current epidemic.

1992 – The Kentucky Supreme Court rules that the state’s anti-sodomy laws violate the rights to privacy and equal protection as guaranteed by the state constitution.

2003, Cairo – Sixty-two men are arrested for homosexuality. They’re charged with “habitual practice of debauchery” and face up to three years in prison.

2004, Canada – Nova Scotia becomes the sixth of Canada’s provinces or territories to have legal same-sex marriage.

2007 – Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad claims Iran has no homosexuals while speaking at Columbia University.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 25

1791, France – In France, the new law code, enacted as part of the French Revolution, effectively decriminalizes sodomy by including no mention of sex between consenting adults.

1949 – Pedro Almodóvar Caballero (born September 25, 1949) is a Spanish film director, screenwriter, producer and former actor. He came to prominence as a director and screenwriter during La Movida Madrileña, a cultural renaissance that followed the death of Spanish dictator Francisco Franco. His first few films characterized the sense of sexual and political freedom of the period. Almodóvar is gay and has been with his partner, actor and photographer Fernando Iglesias, since 2002. Almodóvar often casts him in small roles in his films

1976 – Three volunteer members of the Mississippi Gay Alliance are arrested in Smith Park in Jackson, charged with loitering. The US Civil Rights Commission label the incident as part of a pattern of police harassment.

1984 – Over 5800 Pages of J. Edgar Hoover’s personal war on “Sex Deviate” gays is released. He waged an unrelenting war against gays even though he was gay himself and lived with his lover Clyde Tolson for decades.

2004 – California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signs AB 2900, a bill to unify all state anti-discrimination codes to match the California Fair Employment and Housing Act.

2010, Germany – A homosexual-specific Holocaust memorial plaque is unveiled at the Natzweiler-Struthof concentration camp. The plaque reads In Memory of the Victims of Nazi Barbarity. Deported Because of Their Homosexuality.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 26

1915 – Argenio Fanucci is imprisoned in Seattle, WA, for the crime of carnal knowledge.

1957 – Leonard Bernstein’s ground-breaking musical West Side Story (later made into the film by the same name) opens on Broadway. The musical is a modern remake of the classic Romeo and Juliet by playwright William Shakespeare. Historians describe Bernstein as bisexual and some conjecture that Shakespeare was gay.

1965 – In San Francisco, thirty people picketed Grace Cathedral to protest punitive actions taken against Rev. Canon Robert Cromey for his involvement in the Council on Religion and the Homosexual, an alliance between LGBT people and religious leaders

1970 – In Los Angeles, Gay Liberation Front demonstrators persuade bar owners to allow gay patrons to hold hands.

1973, Canada – Toronto’s Club Baths opens at 231 Mutual Street. It is the first of modern gay-operated bathhouses in Canada.

1992 – Amid a bitterly contested campaign in Oregon for and against Measure 9, an anti-gay rights initiative, a lesbian and a gay man are killed when local skinheads throw a Molotov cocktail into their apartment in Salem.

2000, South Korea – Hon Seok-Cheon  (born February 3, 1971) comes out as gay and is fired from his acing role on the children’s television program “Popopo.” In 2008 he hosted a television program called “Coming Out” about the lives of lesbians and gay men.

2013, Mexico – “Boys on the Road,” the first gay travel TV program in Latin America, premieres on E! Entertainment (Latin).

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 27

1907 –  John Leonell, 23, and Tom McLaughlin, 28, commit suicide in an Ohio hotel room, locked in each other’s arms.

1970 – Chicago Gay Alliance separates from the local Gay Liberation Front (GLF), declaring in a position statement that GLF’s political agenda is too broad to be effective in the struggle for gay and lesbian civil rights.

1974 – The National Gay [later: and lesbian] Task Force and other lesbian and gay activists persuade major consumer advertisers to withdraw commercials from a Marcus Welby, MD, episode about a high school boy who is raped by a male teacher. Their achievement is hailed as the first successful protest against alleged defamation of gay men on American Television.

1994, Canada – Real Menard (born May 13, 1962), a Montreal representative of the Bloc Quebecois, becomes the second MP to come out when he tells reporters that he is “speaking for the community” to which he belongs when he protests the televised statements of another member of Parliament, Roseanne Skoke of Nova Scotia, among which is the claim that “this [gay and lesbian] love, this compassion, based on an inhuman act, defiles humanity, destroys family … and is annihilating mankind.”

2008 – Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read. Many GLBT-themed books have been among those banned over the years. According to the American Library Association, “For a second consecutive year, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell’s award-winning ‘And Tango Makes Three,’ a children’s book about two male penguins caring for an orphaned egg, tops the list of American Library Association’s (ALA) 10 Most Challenged Books of 2007.” The 9th most challenged book in the U.S. last year was “It’s Perfectly Normal” by Robie Harris. It was challenged because it is about sex education and is sexually explicit.

2013 – New Jersey Superior Court rules that same-sex couples be allowed to marry.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 28

1292, Ghent (in present-day Belgium) – John, a knife maker, is sentenced to be burned at the stake for having sex with another man. This is the first documented execution for sodomy in Western Europe

1947 – Author Margaret Wise Brown’s (May 23, 1910 – November 13, 1952) classic children’s book Goodnight Moon is published. In the summer of 1940 Brown began a long-term relationship with Blanche Oelrichs (October 1, 1890 – November 5, 1950) (nom de plume Michael Strange), poet/playwright, actress, and the former wife of John Barrymore. The relationship, which began as a mentoring one, eventually became romantic, and included co-habitating at 10 Gracie Square in Manhattan beginning in 1943. As a studio, they used Cobble Court, a wooden house later moved to Charles Street. Oelrichs, who was 20 years Brown’s senior, died in 1950.

2004, Sierra Leone – LGBT rights activist FannyAnn Eddy (1974–2004) is murdered in Freetown. She established the Sierra Leone Lesbian and Gay Association in 2002.

2011, Strasburg – The European Parliament in Strasburg passes a resolution against discrimination based on sexual orientation.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 29

1926 – The Captive, a melodrama about a young woman seduced by an older woman (her “shadow”), creates a sensation on Broadway for its lesbian undertones

1926 – The Captive, a melodrama about a young woman seduced by an older woman (her “shadow”), creates a sensation on Broadway.

1948 – Rope, an Alfred Hitchcock film with a gay subtext, opens in theaters. Based on the play of the same name by Patrick Hamilton and adapted by Hume Cronyn, it was inspired by the real-life thrill kill murder of 14-year-old Bobby Franks in 1924 by gay University of Chicago students Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb.

1963 – Judy Garland’s variety show debuts Sunday on CBS. The Judy Garland Show was an American musical variety television series that aired on CBS on Sunday nights during the 1963-1964 television season. Despite a sometimes stormy relationship with Judy Garland, CBS had found success with several television specials featuring the star. Garland, who for years had been reluctant to commit to a weekly series, saw the show as her best chance to pull herself out of severe financial difficulties.

1973 – W.H. Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) dies in Vienna at age 63. He was an English-American poet. Auden’s poetry was noted for its stylistic and technical achievement, its engagement with politics, morals, love, and religion, and its variety in tone, form and content.  From around 1927 to 1939 Auden and Christopher Isherwood maintained a lasting but intermittent sexual friendship while both had briefer but more intense relations with other men. In 1939 Auden fell in love with Chester Kallman and regarded their relation as a marriage; this ended in 1941 when Kallman refused to accept the faithful relation that Auden demanded, but the two maintained their friendship, and from 1947 until Auden’s death they lived in the same house or apartment in a non-sexual relation, often collaborating on opera libretti such as The Rake’s Progress, for music by Igor Stravinsky.

1991 – California Governor Pete Wilson vetoes AB 101, a gay and lesbian employment rights bill, inciting what some call Stonewall II, a month of marches and angry protests across the state.

1992 – Actor, singer, and songwriter Paul Jabara (January 31, 1948 – September 29, 1992) dies from AIDS at the age of 44.  Jabara wrote Donna Summer’s Last Dance from Thank God It’s Friday, Barbra Streisand’s song The Main Event/Fight (1979), and co-wrote the Weather Girls hit It’s Raining Men with Paul Shaffer. Paul Jabara won both Grammy Award for Best R&B Song and the Academy Award for Best Original Song for Last Dance from TGIF in which he also played the role of Carl, the lovelorn and nearsighted disco goer.

2006 – Closet case Florida Republican congressman Mark Foley (born September 8, 1954) resigns after Instant Messages of a sexual nature between him and underage male congressional pages are revealed.

2006 – GLAD files and wins lawsuit on behalf of Rhode Island to allow out-of-state same-sex couples to marry in Massachusetts, the only state in the country in which same-sex marriage is legal.

2012 – California becomes the first state to ban gay conversion therapy on minors to “cure” them of their homosexuality.

 

This Day in LGBT History – September 30

1901 – Upon death, Charles Hall reveals to have been female. He was married to Guisseppa Boriani. Hall’s gender identity makes headlines nationwide.

1924 – Truman Garcia Capote (born Truman Streckfus Persons, September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) is born. He was an American novelist, screenwriter, playwright, and actor, many of whose short stories, novels, plays, and nonfiction are recognized as literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood(1966), which he labeled a “nonfiction novel”. At least 20 films and television dramas have been produced of Capote novels, stories, and plays. Capote was openly homosexual. One of his first serious lovers was Smith College literature professor Newton Arvin. Although Capote seemed never really to embrace the gay rights movement, his own openness about homosexuality and his encouragement for openness in others makes him an important player in the realm of gay rights nonetheless. Capote died in Bel Air, Los Angeles, on August 25, 1984, age 59. According to the coroner’s report, the cause of death was “liver disease complicated by phlebitis and multiple drug intoxication.”[59]He died at the home of his old friend Joanne Carson, ex-wife of late-night TV host Johnny Carson, on whose program Capote had been a frequent guest. Gore Vidal responded to news of Capote’s death by calling it “a wise career move.”

1935 – Johnny Mathis (born September 30, 1935) is born. A beloved velvet-voiced jazz and pop singer, Johnny would come out to his public in an interview for Us magazine in June 1982.

1959, Paraguay – The first public action for gay human rights takes place after the Paraguayan government arrests hundreds of gay men without warrant and tortures them for being gay.

1983 – New York State sues a West 12th Street co-op for trying to evict Dr. Joseph Sonnabend for treating AIDS patients. He later receives $10,000 and a new lease.

2000, Australia – Swedish athlete Kajsa Bergqvist (born 12 October 1976) wins the Olympic Bronze Medal for high jumping. She comes out as lesbian in 2011.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 1

October 1-31 – National LGBT History Month; National Family Sexuality Education Month;

1867, Germany – The Order of Chaerona, founded by George Cecil Ives (1 October 1867 – 4 June 1950). This underground society for gays and lesbians was formed as a way for members of sexual minorities to communicate and support one another. Ives was keen to stress that the Order was to be an ascetic movement, not to be used as a forum for men to meet men for sex, although he accepted a degree of ‘passionate sensuality’ could take place. He also believed that love and sex between men was a way to undermine the rigid class system, as a true form of democracy. The society is named after the location of the battle where the Sacred Band of Thebes was finally annihilated in 338 BC. At his death in 1950, George Ives left a large archive covering his life and work between 1874 and 1949. The papers were bought in 1977 by the Harry Ransom Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

1936, Spain – Francisco Franco is proclaimed Generalissimo and Head of State. His dictatorship lasts 40 years during which thousands of homosexuals are jailed, put in camps, or locked up in mental institutions for breaking the Vagrancy Act.

1971 – Connecticut becomes the second state to abolish its laws prohibiting homosexual acts by consenting adults.

1971 – African Americans Donna Burkett, 25, and Manonia Evans, 21, apply for a marriage license in Wisconsin but the application is refused by the clerk. The two women file a lawsuit but the suit is dismissed. They have a wedding without a license on December 25, 1971.

1981 – The U.S. House of Representatives fails to pass a bill that would decriminalize homosexual acts between consenting adults in the District of Columbia.

1981 – The first issue of “The Newsletter” for lesbian and bisexual women is published in North Carolina.

1982 – Glenn Burke, (November 16, 1952 – May 30, 1995) comes out in an interview in Inside Sports. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) player for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland Athletics from 1976 to 1979. Burke was the first and only MLB player to come out as gay to teammates and team owners during his professional career and the first to publicly acknowledge it. He died from AIDS-related causes in 1995.

1986 – The Roman Catholic Church issues Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger’s “Letter to the Bishops of the Catholic Church on the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons.” In the document, Ratzinger clarifies the Church’s condemnation of the “homosexual inclination” as a “tendency toward an intrinsic moral evil” and an “objective disorder,” and criticizes Catholics who have been guilty of “an overly benign interpretation of the homosexual condition.”

1987 – The US Senate votes 75-23 to allow the former hospital at Presidio Army base to be used for a regional AIDS treatment facility in order to meet the projected needs of San Francisco. President Reagan said if the bill were passed by the House of Representatives, he would veto it.

1987 – ACT-UP disrupted evangelist Pat Robertson’s formal announcement of his candidacy for the Republican nomination for US President.

1989, Denmark – Axil (3 April 1915 – 29 October 2011) and Eigil Axgil (24 April 1922 – 22 September 1995) became the first gay couple to be legally married in Copenhagen. They had been together for 40 years, 32 of which were under a common last name. Ten other couples were married the same day. In 1989, Denmark became the first nation in the world to recognize registered partnerships for same-sex couples, nearly equal to (opposite-sex) marriage. On 1 October 1989 the Axgils and 10 other Danish couples were married by Tom Ahlberg, the deputy mayor of Copenhagen, in the city hall, accompanied by worldwide media attention. The Axgils had been a couple for 40 years. In 2013, Axel Axgil was named by Equality Forum as one of their 31 Icons of the LGBT History Month

1989, Denmark – Denmark authorizes “registered partnerships” for lesbian and gay couples. The partnerships are considered similar to MARRIAGE, although they do not include rights to adoption, artificial insemination, or religious wedding ceremonies in state Lutheran Churches.

1993, Canada – An Ottawa court ordered the Canadian government to grant a gay federal worker spousal and bereavement benefits equal to those heterosexual employees receive.

1993 – National Public Radio in the US announced it would offer domestic partner medical and dental benefits to employees in same-sex relationships. The policy also included unmarried heterosexual couples.

1994 – Rodney Wilson, a Missouri high school teacher, creates LGBT history month. He gathers other teachers and community leaders who select October because public schools are in session and existing traditions, such as Coming Out Day (October 11), occur that month.

1996, Argentina – Buenos Aires police begin a campaign of raids on gay and lesbian clubs and arrests of cross-dressing patrons and transsexuals in an apparent protest against impending gay and lesbian rights measures.

1998 – Javier Cruz was executed in Texas by lethal injection for the murder of two gay men, James Ryan, 69, and Louis Neal, 71, in their home.

1999, Columbia – The first sexual orientation-related case presented to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights occurs. Marta Alvarez, a lesbian inmate, campaigns (beginning in 1994) for the right to same-sex conjugal visits.

2005, France – The first Transgender demonstration takes place in Paris. France later becomes the first county to declassify transsexuality as an illness, in 2009.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 2

1849, Benin –  Explorer Frederick Forbes arrives in the Kingdom of Dahomey (1600-1894) where he saw thousands of Amazons. Amazon tribes have existed in multiple time periods and continents, characterized as female-bodied with traditionally male traits. Forbes wrote “Dahomey and the Dahomans” for further reference.

1650 – The Plymouth colony court found Sara Norman guilty of lewd behavior on a bed with Mary Hammon. She was given a warning and ordered to publicly acknowledge her unchaste behavior. The death penalty in Plymouth applied only to sex between men. Sarah White Norman and Mary Vincent Hammon were prosecuted for “lewd behavior with each other upon a bed”; their trial documents are the only known record of sex between female English colonists in North America in the 17th century. Hammon was only admonished, perhaps because she was younger than sixteen, but in 1650 Norman was convicted and required to acknowledge publicly her “unchaste behavior” with Hammon, as well as warned against future offenses. This may be the only conviction for lesbianism in American history.

1969 – A National Institute of Mental Health study, chaired by Dr. Evelyn Hooker, urges government bodies to decriminalize private sex acts between consenting adults.

1973 – Dr. Howard Brown, former New York City health administrator, comes out. He later becomes director of the National Gay Task Force.

1977 – Glenn Burke (November 16, 1952 – May 30, 1995), the first openly gay player in Major League Baseball, invents the high five following a home run by Dusty Baker. Burke was the first and only MLB player to come out as gay to teammates and team owners during his professional career and the first to publicly acknowledge it. He died from AIDS-related causes in 1995.

1985 – Actor Rock Hudson (November 17, 1925 – October 2, 1985) dies of complications from AIDS. His death resulted in greater attention to the AIDS epidemic. A movie star and matinée idol, Hudson, 59, dies in his home in Beverly Hills. His will includes a bequest that sets up the American Foundation for AIDS Research with his friend Elizabeth Taylor as the founding chair.

1987 – The Minnesota Supreme Court refuses to rule on the constitutionality of the state’s sodomy law, which allows the law to remain on the books.

1987 – Commissioner John Markl of Traverse City Michigan resigns after Cindy and Dean Robb organize a petition campaign to demand that he be recalled after making homophobic remarks. The couple called his resignation a victory for civil and human rights. According to Dean Robb, nearly all of the volunteers he and his wife organized to get signatures were heterosexual.

1990, UK – Metropolitan police met with members of the London direct action group OutRage to discuss their concerns after several actions are directed at UK law enforcement agencies.

1997 – Variety magazine objected to the Motion Picture Association of America’s decision to give the movie Bent an NC-17 rating, pointing out that the sex scenes were far less graphic than heterosexual sex scenes in movies which receive R ratings.

1999-California governor Gray Davis signs three gay rights bills.

2014 – The first transgender bodybuilding competition in the U.S. is held during the FTM Fitness’ First Annual Conference in Atlanta. Shan Stinson, a former Marine, is crowned the first winner.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 3

1847 – Hans Christian Andersen (2 April 1805 – 4 August 1875) was a Danish author. Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen’s popularity is not limited to children; his stories, called eventyr in Danish, express themes that transcend age and nationality. He wrote to the Hereditary Grand-duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, “I love you as a man can only love the noblest and best. This time I felt that you were still more ardent, more affectionate to me. Every little trait is preserved in my heart.”

1961 – In Hollywood, the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) announces a revision of its production code. “In keeping with the culture, the mores and the values of our time,” the revision advises, “homosexuality and other sexual aberrations may now be treated with care, discretion and restraint.” The new ruling paves the way for the release of films like The Children’s Hour and Advise and Consent, but the MPPDA later amends the revision to specify that “sexual aberration” may be “suggested but not actually spelled out.”

October 3, 1970 – Bisexual singer Janis Joplin dies of a heroin overdose.

1980 – U.S. Representative Robert Bauman (R-MD) (born April 4, 1937) was arrested in Washington DC for soliciting sex from a male prostitute. Bauman was a supporter of the Moral Majority and a founding member of the American Conservative Union.

1992 – At the fourth annual Asian Lesbian and Gay Regional Conference in Manila, delegates voted to create the Global Alliance Lesbian and Gay Asia to promote solidarity among Asian sexual minorities.

1997 – Paul Bradford Cain, a 26 year-old champion kickboxer, was sentenced to 25 years to life for the murder of gay scientist Dr. Stanley Keith Runcorn (19 November 1922 – 5 December 1995). In a statement before his sentencing, Cain claimed he was the true victim because Runcorn made a pass at him. The judge disagreed, saying to Cain “I hope you rot in hell because what you did was callous and cruel.” Runcorn was a British physicist whose paleomagnetic reconstruction of the relative motions of Europe and America revived the theory of continental drift and was a major contribution to plate tectonics.

1997, Canada – An Ontario court rules that the province’s Insurance Act had to include same-sex couples in the definition of spouse.

1997, UK – Gay historian and Shakespeare scholar A. L. Rowse (4 December 1903 – 3 October 1997) dies at age 93 in southwest England. He had suffered a stroke the year before. He  was a British author and historian from Cornwall, England, UK.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 4

1890 – Dr. Alan L. Hart, (October 4, 1890 – July 1, 1962), an American tuberculosis specialist, becomes one of the first female-to-male transsexuals to undergo hysterectomy and gonadectomy for the relief of gender dysphoria. Named Alberta Lucille Hart at birth, Hart lives the rest of his life as a man following the surgery.

1913 – E.M. Forster (1 January 1879 – 7 June 1970) finished writing his novel Maurice which is about a young man coming to terms with his homosexuality. It would not be published until 1971, after Forster’s death, at the request of the author. It was published by W.W. Norton.

1983 – The AFL-CIO votes to support gay rights legislation.

1985, Germany – West Germany elects its first openly gay parliament member. Herbert Rusche (born May 6, 1952), a member of the Green Party, founded the first gay organization in Heidelberg in 1972 called Homo Heidelbergensis

1985, UK – The Labour Party Annual Conference approves a resolution calling for the end of all legal discrimination against lesbians and gay men.

1989 – Graham Chapman (8 January 1941 – 4 October 1989) , co-founder of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, dies of throat cancer at the age of 48. Chapman came out in his book A Liar’s Autobiography. He was survived by his lover of 23 years, David Sherlock, and John Tomiczek who the couple adopted as a teenager in 1971.

2012, Puerto Rico – Professional boxer Orlando Cruz (born July 1, 1981), comes out as gay. Cruz became the first boxer to out as gay while still active professionally, stating that “I have and will always be a proud Puerto Rican. I have always been and always will be a proud gay man”

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 5

1513, Panama – Spanish conquistador Vasco Nunez de Balboa discovers a community of cross-dressing males in present-day Panama and, according to reports, feeds at least 40 of them to his dogs.

1726, France – Diplomat, spy and soldier Chevalier d’Eon (5 October 1728 – 21 May 1810), who lived his first 49 years as a man and her last 33 years as a women, is born in born in Tonnerre Burgundy, France. Doctors who examined d’Éon’s body after death discovered “male organs in every respect perfectly formed”, but also feminine characteristics.

1840 – John Addington Symonds 5 October 1840 – 19 April 1893) is born. He is one of the earliest scholars of gay and lesbian issues is born. Symonds assisted Havelock Ellis in the writing of Sexual Inversion. A cultural historian, he was known for his work on the Renaissance, as well as numerous biographies of writers and artists. Although he married and had a family, he was an early advocate of male love (homosexuality), which he believed could include pederastic as well as egalitarian relationships, referring to it as l’amour de l’impossible (love of the impossible). He also wrote much poetry inspired by his homosexual affairs.

1851 – Charity Bryant (May 22, 1777 – October 6, 1851) dies and is interred with her lover of 44 years, Sylvia Drake, in Weybridge Hill Cemetery, Addison County, Vermont. This couple is most strongly documented in historian Rachel Hope Cleves’ 2014 book Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America. Charity was an American business owner and writer. She was a diarist and wrote acrostic poetry.[3] Because there is extensive documentation for the shared lives of Bryant and her partner, Sylvia Drake, their diaries, letters and business papers have become an important part of the archive in documenting the history of same-sex couples.

1961 – The movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s, written by openly gay Truman Capote (September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) and adapted for the screen by George Axelrod, opens in theaters.

1969 – The Washington Blade publishes its first issue. At that time it was called The Gay Blade and contained hard hitting journalism and gay activism.

1987 – Traverse City, Michigan, votes unanimously to repeal a law banning the sale of condoms in city limits.

1990 – Dennis Barrie, director of the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center, was acquitted of obscenity charges after displaying a Robert Mapplethorpe (November 4, 1946 – March 9, 1989) exhibit.

1998 – The U.S. Congress killed an amendment by Rep Frank Riggs (R-CA) which would have barred San Francisco from using federal housing money to implement its domestic partner ordinance.

1999 – African scholar Ali Mazrui criticizes Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni for targeting gay and lesbian citizens for harassment and arrest.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 6

1791, France – France is the first Western European country to decriminalize homosexual acts.

1928 – The New York Times reported that George Bernard Shaw and H.G. Wells had protested the seizure of the lesbian novel by Radfclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, by English customs agents. The novel had been published in France and was being imported into England.

1963 – Judy Garland sings with Barbra Streisand on Judy’s variety show. It is their one and only performance together.

1968 – Metropolitan Community Church is founded in Los Angeles by Rev. Troy Perry (born July 27, 1940) in the living room of his in Los Angeles. Perry founded the church with a primary outreach to the GLBT community.

1972 – Antonio Molina and William “Billie” Ert marry in Houston. Ert, a drag queen, and Molina, a shipping clerk, received the license through having Ert dress in drag; the county clerk’s office did not ask for their sexes and issued them a marriage license, which they used to marry one day later. At that time, homosexuality was illegal in Texas. Although it was later declared null and void by the Texas Attorney General after a long legal battle, the union made international headlines and became a media sensation. The failed lawsuit sparked Texas legislation that specifically defined marriage as between a man and a woman, which it had not yet done, and was seen as a large setback for LGBT rights in the United States.

1973, Canada – In Quebec City the first pan-Canadian conference of gay organizations is hosted by Centre humanitaire d’aide de libération 

1989 – Just two years after its first public showing, the AIDS Quilt returns to Washington, D.C. with 10,848 panels. At its premiere it had only 1,920 panels.

1989, Mexico – The Permanent Revolution Circle ZYANYA of Lesbian Feminists organizes this first three-day forum at the School of Economics at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

1989 – In reaction to a small, peaceful protest against federal neglect of people with AIDS, about 200 San Francisco police officers rioted in the Castro neighborhood, beating protesters and passersby, sweeping seven city blocks of all pedestrians, and placing thousands in homes and business under house arrest for the duration.

1997 – Annie Proulx’s short story Brokeback Mountain is published in this week’s issue of The New Yorker. The story, later turned into a hit movie, depicts the complex romantic and sexual relationship between two men in the American West from 1963 to 1981. In 2007, the composer Charles Wuorinen approached Proulx with the idea of turning her short story “Brokeback Mountain” into an opera. The opera of the same name with a libretto by Proulx herself premiered January 28, 2014 at the Teatro Real in Madrid, to mixed reviews.

1997 – The US Supreme Court refused to hear a case filed by Sandy Nelson, a reporter who was demoted because she refused to stop her off-duty campaigning in support of a gay rights initiative in Washington. The Washington Supreme Court had ruled that a law barring discrimination in employment for political views did not apply to newspapers.

1998 – Twenty-one year old gay college student Matthew Shepard (December 1, 1976 – October 12, 1998) of Wyoming was beaten, pistol whipped and tied to a fence in a field near Laramie. He would die of his injuries at a hospital in Ft Collins, Colorado. He dies on Oct. 12th. Perpetrators Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson were arrested shortly after the attack and charged with first degree murder following Shepard’s death. Significant media coverage was given to the killing and what role Shepard’s sexual orientation might have played as a motive in the commission of the crime. The prosecutor argued that McKinney’s murder of Shepard was premeditated and driven by greed. McKinney’s defense counsel countered that he had only intended to rob Shepard, but had killed him in a rage when Shepard made a sexual advance towards him. McKinney’s girlfriend told police that he had been motivated by anti-gay sentiment, but later recanted her statement, saying that she had lied because she thought it would help him. Both McKinney and Henderson were convicted of the murder and each sentenced to two consecutive life sentences.

1998 – The Ford Foundation gave a $100,000 grant to the United Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches for its programs targeting at-risk gay and lesbian youth.

1999 – Donna Brazile (born December 15, 1959), an out lesbian, becomes Al Gore’s campaign manager. She is an American author and political analyst. She is a member of the Democratic Party, briefly serving as the interim chairperson for the Democratic National Committee in spring 2011, and assumed that role again in July 2016, until February 2017. She was the first African American to direct a major presidential campaign, acting as campaign manager for Al Gore in 2000. She has also worked on several presidential campaigns for Democratic candidates, including Jesse Jackson and Walter Mondale–Geraldine Ferraro in 1984, and for Dick Gephardt in the 1988 Democratic primary. In 1999, The New York Times Magazine described Brazile as an LGBT activist who served on the board of the Millennium March on Washington. The magazine said she is “highly protective of her privacy” and called her “openly ambiguous” about her sexual orientation. Brazile is described as “openly lesbian” in the 2002 book Gay and Lesbian Americans and Political Participation: A Reference Handbook.

2014:  The Supreme Court refuses to hear appeals on seven of the petitions arising from challenges to state bans on same-sex marriage. That means that meant that the lower-court decisions striking down bans in Indiana, Wisconsin, Utah, Oklahoma, and Virginia should go into effect, clearing the way for same-sex marriages in those states and any other state with similar bans in those circuits.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 7

1728, France – Charles Genevieve Louise Auguste Andre Timothee d’Eon (5 October 1728 – 21 May 1810), is born in Burgundy. He was usually known as the Chevalier d’Éon, and was a French diplomat, spy, freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years’ War. D’Éon had androgynous physical characteristics and natural abilities as a mimic, good features for a spy. D’Éon appeared publicly as a man and pursued masculine occupations for 49 years, although during that time d’Éon successfully infiltrated the court of Empress Elizabeth of Russia by presenting as a woman. For 33 years, from 1777, d’Éon dressed as a woman, identifying as female. Doctors who examined d’Éon’s body after death discovered “male organs in every respect perfectly formed”, but also feminine characteristics.

1921 – Vice Versa, 1947, the first North American lesbian publication, is written and self-published by Edythe D. Eyde (November 7, 1921 – December 22, 2015), better known by her pen name Lisa Ben. She was an American editor, author, and songwriter. Ben produced the magazine for a year and distributed it locally in Los Angeles, California in the late 1940s. She was also active in lesbian bars as a musician in the years following her involvement with Vice Versa. Eyde has been recognized as a pioneer in the LGBT movement.

1940 – Althea Garrison (born October 7, 1940) is born. She is an American politician from Boston, Massachusetts who was elected as a Republican to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1992 and served one term from 1993 to 1995. Both before and after Garrison’s successful bid for office, she ran unsuccessfully in multiple elections for the state legislature and Boston City Council, as a Republican, Democrat, or independent, which has resulted in her being described in the media as a “perennial candidate.” Garrison is also known as the first transgender or transsexual person to be elected to a state legislature in the United States.

1943 – Famed author Marguerite Radclyffe Hall (12 August 1880 – 7 October 1943) passes away. Hall’s novel The Well of Loneliness was banned in several countries because of lesbian content.

1959 – Russell Wolden, running for mayor of San Francisco as a Democrat, accuses the incumbent of welcoming and collaborating with the city’s “sex deviates.” His tactic backfires: the city’s newspapers accuse him of irresponsible mudslinging, and he loses in the next month’s elections.

1959 – Pillow Talk, starring Doris Day, the closeted gay actor Rock Hudson (November 17, 1925 – October 2, 1985), and the straight actor everyone thought was gay Tony Randall, opens in theaters and becomes the 2nd highest grossing film of the 1950’s.

1964 – Walter Jenkins (March 23, 1918 – November 23, 1985), Lyndon B. Johnson’s top aide, was arrested for having sex in the men’s bathroom of his local YMCA just blocks from the White House. Jenkins who was married, had 6 children, and was never divorced from his wife.

1967 – The Advocate begins publication. The magazine is the oldest and largest LGBT publication in the United States and the only surviving one of its kind that was founded before the 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York City, an incident that is generally credited as the beginning of the LGBT rights movement.

1975 – Musician Elton John (born March 25, 1947) said he was bisexual in Rolling Stone magazine. He is an English singer, pianist, and composer. He has worked with lyricist Bernie Taupin as his songwriting partner since 1967; they have collaborated on more than 30 albums to date. He has received five Grammy Awards, five Brit Awards – winning two awards for Outstanding Contribution to Music and the first Brits Icon in 2013 for his “lasting impact on British culture”, an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, a Tony Award, a Disney Legends award, and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2004. He has been heavily involved in the fight against AIDS since the late 1980s. He  has been openly gay since 1988, entered into a civil partnership with David Furnish on 21 December 2005, and after same-sex marriage became legal in England and Wales in 2014, wed Furnish on 21 December 2014. He continues to be a champion for LGBT social movements worldwide.

1981, Canada – In Toronto, a Dykes in the Street march, sponsored by Lesbians Against the Right, becomes the first lesbian pride march in the city.

1983 – The first explicitly LGBT internet newsgroup was founded by Steve Dyer called soc.mots. The abbreviation “motss” stood for “members of the same sex,” an unflashy acronym that would make it less of a potential target for censorship. University of Colorado–Boulder professor Amy Goodloe, who went on to start many lesbian Usenet groups as well as found and run lesbian.org in 1995, calls soc.motss the first explicitly LGBTQ newsgroup—and possibly the first explicitly LGBTQ international space of any kind.

1986 – The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors outlaws the sale and use of “poppers” (amyl nitrate).

1987 – A US Justice Department report declared the most frequent victims of hate crimes are gays, lesbians, and bisexuals.

1993 – A protest, complete with a book burning, was held to object to a donation of two gay-themed books, Annie on My Mind and All-American Boys to 42 Kansas City Missouri high schools.

1993 – The AFL-CIO unanimously approves a resolution to actively oppose attempts to repeal gay rights laws. The vote was held at the labor union’s biennial convention in San Francisco.

1996 – 250 students in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania walked out of class to protest the school board’s passage of a “pro-family” resolution which banned positive discussion of homosexuality.

2014, Kenya – Transgender activist Audrey Mbugua (born 1984) wins a landmark case against the Kenya National Examinations Council who had refused to change her name and gender marker on her academic diploma. She is a Kenyan transgender activist who has been involved in legal actions in the High Court of Kenya to fight for the rights of transgender people.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 8

1904, Germany – At a meeting of the Scientific Humanitarian Committee, one of the earliest gay organizations, women’s rights leader Anna Rueling urges feminists to unite with “Uranian” (lesbian) women and men in the fight for social reform, citing concerns and goals common to both movements. She criticized the women’s movement for not taking an active role in ending the oppression of lesbians.

1958 – Urvashi Vaid (born 8 October 1958) is an Indian-American LGBT rights activist. Vaid spent ten years working in global philanthropic organizations, serving as Executive Director of the Arcus Foundation (2005-2010) and Deputy Director of Governance and Civil Society Unit of the Ford Foundation (2000-2005). For more than 10 years, Vaid worked in various capacities at the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF), the oldest national LGBT civil rights organization; first as its media director, then as executive director, and as director of its Policy Institute Think-tank. From 1983 to 1986, Vaid was staff attorney at the National Prison Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), where she initiated the organization’s work on HIV/AIDS in prisons. Vaid has lived in New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts, with her partner comedian Kate Clinton since 1988.

1970 – In New York City, two policemen invade a private club to interrupt a Daughters of Bilitis business meeting. The blatantly harassing nature of the police action persuades many members of the low profile group of the need for action. The Daughters of Bilitis, also called the DOB or the Daughters, was the first lesbian civil and political rights organization in the United States.

1971, Australia – The first gay rights demonstration in Sydney takes place. It’s held outside the headquarters of the Liberal Party. Gay writer and activist Dennis Altman (born 16 August 1943) is one of about 70 protesters. He is an Australian academic and pioneering gay rights activist.

1972 – Demonstrators at the annual convention of the Association for the Advancement of Behavioral Therapy protest the continued use of “aversion therapy” to “treat” homosexuality.

1985 – Latina activists form the Austin, TX Latina Latino Lesbian and Gay Organization (ALLGO).

1997 – An episode of the Ellen DeGeneres’ sitcom titled “Roommates” receives an adult content warning because it contains a kiss between Ellen and another woman. The censorship reportedly infuriated Ellen, with her telling reporters: “I never wanted to be an activist, but now they’re turning me into one.”

2003, Canada – The first gay character comes out on Degrassi: The Next Generation. Marco, played by Adamo Ruggiero, comes out in the two-part episode titled “Pride.”

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 9

1970 – In Minneapolis, FREE (Gay Liberation of Minnesota) opens the first “Regional Gay Convention” in the Midwest.

1993 – Following his retirement in 1993, Episcopal Bishop E. Otis Charles (called Otis; April 24, 1926 – December 26, 2013) becomes the first Christian bishop to come out of the closet at the age of 67. He served as bishop of Utah from 1971-1986. He later marries Dr. Felipe Sanchez-Paris (1941-2013) and becomes a prominent gay rights activist.

1998 – South Africa officially repeals its sodomy law

1998 –  The Netherlands sanctions adoption by same-sex couples as long as they meet the same criteria required of heterosexual couples.

1998 – Russell Henderson and Aaron McKinney from Laramie, Wyoming, make their first court appearance after being arrested for the murder of Matthew Shepard (December 1, 1976 – October 12, 1998). Eventually, they each receive two life sentences for killing Shepard. Matthew was an American student at the University of Wyoming who was beaten, tortured, and left to die near Laramie on the night of October 6, 1998. Six days later, he died from severe head injuries at Poudre Valley Hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado.

1999, Austria – Lesbian politician Ulrike Lunacek (born 26 May 1957) becomes the first openly gay member of Austrian Parliament, serving with the Austrian Green party. She is an Austrian politician and Member of the European Parliament (MEP) from Austria. She is Vice President of the European Parliament, Member of the Greens/EFA group in the European Parliament since 2009 and head of delegation of the Austrian Greens in the European Parliament. Lunacek is Kosovo-Rapporteur and co-president of the Intergroup on LGBTI Rights and Member of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and Substitute in the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affair. In 2013, Lunacek advocated for a non-binding resolution on “Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights”.[11]that called for “age-appropriate and gender-sensitive sexuality and relationship education … for all children and adolescents” and referenced a document co-authored by the WHO in which some sexuality information is deemed appropriate from age 4. After some controversy, the European Parliament instead passed a modified version which declared sexual education a competence of the member states.

2002 –  Lesbian serial killer Aileen Wournos (February 29, 1956 – October 9, 2002) is executed in Florida. She was an American serial killer who murdered seven men in Florida between 1989 and 1990 by shooting them at point-blank range. Wuornos claimed that her victims had either raped or attempted to rape her while she was working as a sex worker, and that all of the homicides were committed in self-defense. She was convicted and sentenced to death for six of the murders and was executed by lethal injection on October 9, 2002.

2007 – A Shot of Love with Tila Tequila, a reality dating show about a bisexual women dating both male and female contestants, premiers.

2008 – Stephan Thorne of the San Francisco Police Department is promoted to Lieutenant, making him the highest-ranking transgender law enforcement official in the country.

2011 – California Governor Jerry Brown announces the signing of the Gender Nondiscrimination Act (AB 887) and the Vital Statistics Modernization Act (AB 443). AB 887 makes illegal discrimination based on gender identity or expression in employment, education, housing, and other public settings and AB 443 allows transgender people to obtain a court order to protect their gender.

2011, Poland – The first transgender member of Parliament in Europe, Anna Grodzka (born 16 March 1954), is elected. She is a Polish politician. Grodzka, a trans woman, was elected to the Sejm in the 2011 Polish parliamentary elections as a candidate for the left-liberal Palikot’s Movement, and was the first openly transgender Member of Parliament in Poland. In June 2014, Anna Grodzka joined Poland’s Green Party.

 

This Day in LGBT History – October 10

1915 – Albert D. J. Cashier (December 25, 1843 – October 10, 1915) dies. Born Jennie Irene Hodgers, he was an Irish-born immigrant who served as a male soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He lived as a man in Illinois, voted in elections and later claimed a veteran’s pension. On May 5, 1911, Cashier was moved to the Soldier and Sailors home in Quincy, Illinois. He lived there as a man until his mind deteriorated and was moved to the Watertown State Hospital for the Insane in March 1913.  Attendants at the Watertown discovered his female body when giving him a bath, at which point he was forced to wear a dress.

1936, Germany – The Reich Central Office for Combatting Abortion and Homosexuality forms. The main function was to gather data on homosexuals that led to arrests. Through 1945, an estimated 100,000 gay men were arrested and sent to concentration camps or prison, wearing the pink triangle. When the camps were liberated, they were not freed but sent to prison from the camps until the anti-gay Paragraph 175 was repealed in 1968. There is little data on the number of lesbians arrested though it is known that they had to wear the black triangle. German lesbians were usually sent to Spring of Life homes for impregnation. Jewish lesbians were sent to their deaths in the camps.

1949 – Newsweek Magazine publishes a story entitled “Queer People,” calling gays perverts and comparing them to exhibitionists and sexual sadists. It challenged the idea that homosexuals hurt no one but themselves.

1971 – Seven lesbians, including Barbara Gittings, break new ground on U.S. television when they appear on The David Susskind Show

1973, Canada – Toronto City council passes a resolution banning discrimination in municipal hiring on the basis of sexual orientation. It’s the first such legislation in Canada.

1987 – Two thousand gay and lesbian couples exchange vows in a mass wedding held on the steps of the I.R.S. building in Washington, DC

1995 – The United States Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Romer v. Evans, the case that would eventually overturn Colorado’s Amendment 2 which said that homosexuals and bisexuals were not a protected class.

1996, Argentina – The city of Buenos Aires enacts legislation banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and repeals laws that allowed police to arrest lesbians and gay men and hold them without charge for 24 hours.

2008 –  In Kerrigan v. Commissioner of Public Health, the Connecticut Supreme Court rules in a 4-3 vote that the state’s constitution protects the right to same-sex marriage.

2010, Serbia – A thousand people march in the second Belgrade Pride parade, drawing 6000 violent anti-gay protestors.


Let your voice speak out and change the world! 

Warmly,

Ronni

 

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, Lavender Effect, DataLounge.com, Arron’s Gay Info, All Things Queer, RS Levinson, Amara Das Wilhelm, Safe Schools Coalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

 

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