THIS DAY IN LGBT HISTORY – NOVEMBER 25

Musings of an Aging Lesbian

Kelly and I started a fun project yesterday. We’re writing journals – for others to document their paths – for lesbians and gay men who travel and for people in recovery. This is such a fun thing to do, and yes, another shiny penny. But it’s activities like this that keep my brain cells fired and my creativity flowing. I’m also working on a couple of new plays, so there is little room for moss to grow in this fertile field of my mind. Just because I’m aging doesn’t mean I’m not functioning at nearly full-tilt boogie!

 Gratitude Day 25

Today I’m grateful for my two oldest granddaughters. They are talented, kind, smart, and beautiful yet very different women who are finding their way in the world. Beth, at 24, is a free-spirit soul, open about her love for her girlfriend, and a rising artist who did the cover of my book, The Soldier, the Avatar, and the Holocaust. Callie will be 21, is a talented musician with many awards, and a graphics design major in college who cares deeply about the well-being of others and isn’t afraid to speak truth to power. These two young women take after their mother, my daughter, in so many ways, and I’m deeply proud of all three of them!

I invite you to add that for which you are grateful today.


Rudyard Kipling said: If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten. The snippets of LGBTQ history here are the stories of our lives, the stories of the giants on whose shoulders we all stand. Learn about them then tell the stories and remember…

Thanks for taking this journey with me. Now go write your story!


THIS DAY IN LGBT HISTORY – NOVEMBER 25

 1837 & 1931 – Elizabeth M. Cushier (Nov.25, 1837-Nov. 25, 1931), one of eleven children, was born in New York City. She was a professor of medicine, and one of New York’s most prominent obstetricians for 25 years. During WWI, Cushier worked in Belgium and France. From 1882, she lived with Dr. Emily Blackwell (October 8, 1826 – September 7, 1910) until Blackwell’s death. Emily Blackwell was the second woman to earn a medical degree at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and the third woman (after Cushier and Lydia Folger Fowler) to earn a medical degree in the United States. Cushier ‘s papers are archived among the Blackwell Family Papers at the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute for Advance Study at Harvard University.

1970 – The Seattle Gay Liberation Front severed ties with the Young Socialist Alliance because their exclusion of homosexuals mirrored Stalin’s practices.

1997, South Africa – A demonstration was held at the Johannesburg High Court in support of an application to decriminalize sex between men.

1997, Ecuador – Ecuador legalizes same-sex sexual activity, overturning the previous Article 516 of the Penal Code that criminalized such acts. South Africa becomes the first country to enact a constitutional ban outlawing sexual orientation discrimination.

1998 – Federal judge Bruce Jenkins rules that Spanish Fork High School in Salt Lake City, Utah, violated the rights of teacher Wendy Weaver, who was dismissed from her position as volleyball coach and ordered not to discuss her sexual orientation, even out of school. The judge ordered the school to offer her the coaching position, lift the gag order, and pay her $1,500 in damages.


Stand up, speak out, share your story!

Warmly,

Ronni

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, #LavenderEffect, DataLounge.com, #ArronsGayInfo, #AllThingsQueer, #RSLevinson, #AmaraDasWilhelm, out.com, #SafeSchoolsCoalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

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