THIS DAY IN LGBT HISTORY – NOVEMBER 30

Musings of an Aging Lesbian

We put our holiday tree up yesterday. Funny thing for a Jewish woman but I love it. We buy ornaments wherever we travel so we have years’ worth of ornaments. Our tree is decorated in those ornaments, bringing back the memories of those trips every year. The tree – and the process of holding each ornament and remembering –brings joy to my heart ab d makes my eyeballs happy!

Gratitude Day 30

Today ends my sharing 30 days of gratitude though I’m grateful every single day for the gifts and blessings of my life, grateful every moment of every day, grateful for the love and the life that I share with Kelly, grateful that my Higher Power directs my life and shows me the way.

Thanks for joining me on this November gratitude journey. As the December holiday season begins, may our gratitude bring us peace…


Rudyard Kipling said: If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten. The snippets of LGBTQ history here are the stories of our lives, the stories of the giants on whose shoulders we all stand. Learn about them then tell the stories and remember…

Thanks for taking this journey with me. Now go write your story!


THIS DAY IN LGBT HISTORY – NOVEMBER 30

1624 – In the Virginia Colony, Richard Cornish, an English ship captain, was hanged for sodomy for allegedly making advances on an indentured servant, William Couse. His conviction and execution, angrily contested by his brother and others, is the first to be recorded in the American colonies. In 1993 the William and Mary Gay and Lesbian Alumni created the Richard Cornish Endowment Fund for Gay and Lesbian Resource

1900, UK – Oscar Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) dies. He was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London’s most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, as well as the circumstances of his imprisonment and early death. Wilde was initially buried in the Cimetière de Bagneux outside Paris; in 1909 his remains were disinterred and transferred to Père Lachaise Cemetery. In 2017, with the coming into force of the Policing and Crime Act 2017, Wilde was among an estimated 50,000 men who were pardoned for his offence of homosexuality , as it was no longer a crime in the UK

1978 – Clay Aiken (born Clayton Holmes Grissom; born November 30, 1978) is born. He is an American singer, songwriter, television personality, actor, author, politician and activist. Aiken was the 2014 Democratic nominee in the North Carolina 2nd congressional district election. After several years of public speculation, Aiken came out as gay in a September 2008 interview with People magazine. In April 2009, Aiken was honored by the Family Equality Council advocacy group at its annual benefit dinner in New York City.

1988 – National League Baseball president Bart Giamatti fires umpire Dave Pallone (born October 5, 1951) for being gay. Pallone is a former Baseball umpire who worked in the National League from 1979 to 1988. During Pallone’s career, he wore uniform number 26. He was “outed” in a New York Post article later in the year. Pallone later wrote his autobiography, Behind the Mask: My Double Life in Baseball, which became New York Times best-seller, and has been republished as an e-book. Pallone now does diversity training for corporations, colleges, universities and athletes with the NCAA. Pallone was part of the first class of inductees to The National Gay and Lesbian Sports Hall of Fame in 2013.

1989 – Columbus Ohio mayor Dana Rinehart signs a hate crimes bill which includes the term sexual orientation. Rinehart had asked the city council to remove the term, saying that it’s vague and does not belong in the ordinance. The council refused.

1993 – President Bill Clinton signs a military policy directive that prohibits openly gay and lesbian Americans from serving in the military, but also prohibits the harassment of “closeted” homosexuals. The policy is known as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” It was repealed on September 20, 2011.

1995 – The first US. government-sponsored advertising targeting gay men debuts on the eve of World AIDS Day when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention releases a public service television announcement cautioning men to have “smart sex.”

2006 – South Africa is the first African country to legalize same-sex marriage.


Stand up, speak out, share your story!

Warmly,

Ronni

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, #LavenderEffect, DataLounge.com, #ArronsGayInfo, #AllThingsQueer, #RSLevinson, #AmaraDasWilhelm, out.com, #SafeSchoolsCoalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.