Today in LGBT History – FEBRUARY 3

Rudyard Kipling said: If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.The snippets of LGBTQ history here are the stories of our lives, the stories of the giants on whose shoulders we all stand. Learn about them then tell the stories…and remember, because knowing your history IS resistance!

Thanks for taking this journey with me. Now go write your story!


Today in LGBT History – FEBRUARY 3

1821 – The first female physician in the U.S., Elizabeth Blackwell (3 February 1821 – 31 May 1910)was born near Bristol, England. As a girl, her family moved to New York State. She was awarded her MD by the Medical Institute of Geneva, New York, in 1849. She then established a hospital in New York City run by an all-female staff. She was also active in training women to be nurses for service in the U.S. Civil War. She was the first woman to graduate from medical school, a pioneer in promoting the education of women in medicine in the United States, and a social and moral reformer in both the United States and in the United Kingdom. Her sisterEmilywas the third woman in the US to get a medical degree. None of the five Blackwell sisters ever married. Since 1949, the American Medical Women’s Association has awarded the Elizabeth Blackwell Medal annually to a woman physician. The Judy Chicago artwork The Dinner Party features a place setting for Elizabeth Blackwell.

1874 – Lesbian writer Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. She was an American novelist, poet, playwright, and art collector. Multifaceted, complicated, and impenetrable, Stein was like the cubist paintings she admired so much. She once summed up her long life with partner Alice B. Toklas  (April 30, 1877 – March 7, 1967) by writing “I love my love because she is peculiar.”

1913 – The 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, granting Congress the authority to collect income taxes. Just wondering: How much have gays and lesbians paid in taxes without full civil rights? 


1938 – Jonathan Ned Katz (born Feb. 3, 1938) is an American historian of human sexuality who has written about same-sex attraction and changes in the social organization of sexuality over time. His works focus on the idea, rooted in social constructionism, that the categories with which we describe and define human sexuality are historically and culturally specific, along with the social organization of sexual activity, desire, relationships, and sexual identities. His works include The Invention of Heterosexuality,the Gay/Lesbian Almanac and Gay American History: Lesbians and Gay Men in the U.S.A. 

1956 – Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is an American stage, film and television actor and writer. He is known for his roles as Albert in The BirdcageMax Bialystokin the musical The Producers, Ernie Smuntz in Mouse Hunt, Nathan Detroit in Guys and Dolls, Pseudolus in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, his voice work in Stuart Little as Snowbell and The Lion King as Timon, and his recurring roles on Modern FamilyThe Good Wife, and American Crime Story: The People v. O. J. Simpson as F. Lee Bailey. In 2006, Lane received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and in 2008, he was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame. Lane, who came out officially after the death of Matthew Shepard(December 1, 1976 – October 12, 1998), has been a long-time board member of and fundraiser for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, and has been honored by the Human Rights CampaignGay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation,The Trevor Project, and the Matthew Shepard Foundation for his work in the LGBTcommunity. On November 17, 2015, Lane married his long-time partner, theater producer, actor and writer Devlin Elliott (born April 13, 1972).

1978, Canada – In Toronto, the House of Bishops of the Anglican Church of Canada affirmed that gay people “are entitled to equal protection under the law with all other Canadian citizens.” 

1988 – Cameron “Butchie” Tanner (died April 21, 1992) was a bartender and drag performer in San Francisco. On this day, he is elected Empress of San Francisco and awarded the Certificate of Honor by the City of San Francisco through the efforts of Supervisor Hongisto. On March 11, 1992, after having seen a movie at a theater in the Latin area below Castro, he was beaten by two thugs with baseball bats. He died from his injuries on April 21, 1992. Although he was not transgender, and it is believed that his killers were not aware that he was gay, he is often included in several transgender memorial lists.

2011 – The National Gay & Lesbian Task Force publishes its report on transgender discrimination, entitled “Injustice at Every Turn: Report on the National Transgender Discrimination Survey.”


Stand up, speak out, share your story!

Warmly,

Ronni

 

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, Lavender Effect, DataLounge.com, Arron’s Gay Info, All Things Queer, RS Levinson, Amara Das Wilhelm, out.com, Safe Schools Coalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

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