Today in LGBT History – FEBRUARY 9

Rudyard Kipling said: If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.The snippets of LGBTQ history here are the stories of our lives, the stories of the giants on whose shoulders we all stand. Learn about them then tell the stories…and remember, because knowing your history IS resistance!

Thanks for taking this journey with me. Now go write your story!


Today in LGBT History – FEBRUARY 9

1874 – Amy Lowell  (February 9, 1874 – May 12, 1925)was born in Brookline. Massachusetts. She was an American poet of the imagist school fromBrookline,Massachusettsand  posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926.A militant literary leader she thumbed her nose at the Boston Brahmans who raised her and outed herself. Her lover was actress Ada Dwyer (1863–1952) whom she called “Peter.” 

1927 – Three plays with same-sex love content are raided and the casts and producers are arrested. The plays are “The Captive,”a controversial play about two women with an “abnormal relationship”; “Sex”starring Mae West; and “The Virgin Man.” The three-act melodramaThe Captive by Édouard Bourdetwas among the first Broadway plays to deal withlesbianismand caused a scandal in New York City. The play was shut down after 160 performances and prompted the adoption of a state law dealing with obscenity; Sex byJane Mastwas“obscene, indecent, immoral, and impure”andput Mae Westin prison for 10 days; The Virgin Man was a 1956 Argentine comedy film directed by Román Viñoly Barreto and starring Luis Sandrini.

1941 – Sheila James Kuehl (born February 9, 1941) is an Americanpolitician and former child actor, currently the member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors for the 3rd District. In 1994, she became the first openly gay California legislator and in 1997, she was the first woman to be named Speaker pro Tempore in California. Kuehl served as a Democratic member of the California State Senate, representing the 23rd district in Los Angeles County and parts of southern Ventura County. A former member of the California State Assembly, she was elected to the Senate in 2000 and served until December 2008. She was elected to her supervisorial post in 2014. As a child actress she performed under the stage name Sheila James. The role for which she is probably best known is her portrayal of teen-aged genius Zelda Gilroy, the wannabe girlfriend of the title character in the television series The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, which aired on CBS from 1959 to 1963. Zelda was originally intended to be a one-shot character in the early Dobie Gillis episode “Love is a Science”, but Dobie creator Max Shulman liked Kuehl and had her signed on as a semi-regular cast member. Since 2010, Kuehl has hosted “Get Used To It”, a national cable show on LGBT issues, filmed in West Hollywood.

1944 – Alice Walker(born February 9, 1944)is born. She is an African-American novelist, short story writer, poet, and activist. She wrote the novel The Color Purple (1982) for which she won the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. She also wrote the novelsMeridian (1976) and The Third Life of Grange Copeland (1970), among other works.Walker dislikes labels but acknowledges having been in love with both men and women and, in a 1996 Essencearticle, described herself as bisexual. Inthe mid-1990s, Walker was involved in a romance with singer-songwriter Tracy Chapman, saying “It was delicious and lovely and wonderful and I totally enjoyed it and I was completely in love with her but it was not anybody’s business but ours.”

1971 – Barely a month after the TV show All in the Family takes to the air, Archie discovers that one of his bar buddies, an ex-football player, is gay. This is the first instance in which a network television program aired a positive plotline involving a gay issue.

1977 – The world’s first gay and lesbian film festival premieres in San Francisco. Frameline is the oldest ongoing film festival devoted to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) programming currently in existence

1994, Italy – Pope Iohn Paul II attacks the European Parliament resolution in favor of lesbian and gay rights.

1999 – The leader of the “moral majority” and founder of the anti-gay hate bastian Liberty Universaly, the “Reverend” Jerry Falwell, claims that the purple-colored Teletubby named Tinky-Wink is gay.

2011, Canada – The Canadian House passes a law protecting gender expression rights.

2018 – Adam Rippon (born November 11, 1989) is an American figure skater. He won the 2010 Four Continents Championships and the 2016 U.S. National Championships. Rippon was selected to represent the United States at the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongchangSouth Koreawhere he won a bronze medal thus becoming the first openly gay U.S. male athlete to win a medal in a Winter Olympics. Later that year, he won season 26 of Dancing with the Stars with professional dancer Jenna Johnson, making Rippon the first openly gay celebrity to win the competition.


Stand up, speak out, share your story!

Warmly,

Ronni

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, Lavender Effect, DataLounge.com, Arron’s Gay Info, All Things Queer, RS Levinson, Amara Das Wilhelm, out.com, Safe Schools Coalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.