Today in LGBT History – October 18

History helps us see that we have a rich past as LGBT people. We’ve been rendered invisible in the history books but our existence is as long and colorful as humankind. The purpose of this bog, therefore, is to share the good, the bad, and ugly, and the fabulousness of being lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. At times I may include Jewish and other histories as well since the Holocaust and other significant events of must be remembered as well. Remembering and sharing history is an act of resistance.

Yesterday I attended the annual lunceon fundraiser for the Seattle Holocaust Center for Humanity. Washington State has no mandate to teach about the Holocaust, so the Center provides all the materials and teacher training necessary for such education to take place in schools. I invite you to visit their website at https://holocaustcenterseattle.org

We’re here, we’re queer, and we’ve been around a heck of a long time! Enjoy!

Keep LGBT history alive! Write the stories of your life and share with others.


Today in LGBT History – October 18

1884, Uganda – Danieri Basammula-Ekkere Mwanga II Mukasa (1868–1903) of Buganda ascends to the throne as the 31st king of Buganda (now Uganda), reigning from 1884 to 1888. He keeps a harem of young boys along with his 16 wives. He was Kabaka of Buganda from 1884 until 1888 and from 1889 until 1897.

1953 – Tim Gill (born October 18, 1953), is born in Hobart, Indiana. He  is an American software entrepreneur, philanthropist, and creator of the Gill Foundation, one of the first major foundations to benefit the LGBTQ community,

1956, Czechoslovakia. – Martina Navratilova (born October 18, 1956) is born in Prague. She is an American tennis player and coach. In 2005, Tennis magazine selected her as the greatest female tennis player for the years 1965 through 2005 and she is considered one of the best, if not the best, female tennis players of all time. She won 18 major singles tennis titles, including nine at Wimbledon. Martina emigrated to the U.S. in 1975, came out as bisexual in 1980, one of the very first pro athletes to do so. She became a U.S. citizen in 1981. In 1981, she came out as bisexual and revealed that she had a sexual relationship with author Rita Mae Brown. Navratilova and Nancy Lieberman, her next girlfriend at the time, gave an interview to Dallas Morning News columnist Bayless, where Navratilova reiterated that she was bisexual and Lieberman identified herself as straight. Navratilova has since identified herself as a lesbian. From 1984 to 1991, Navratilova had a long-term relationship with Judy Nelson, whom she met at a tournament in Fort Worth in 1982. Their split in 1991 included a much-publicized legal wrangle. Navratilova was featured in a WITA (Women’s International Tennis Association) calendar, shot by Jean Renard with her Wimbledon trophies and Nelson’s children in the background. On September 6, 2014, Navratilova proposed to her longtime girlfriend Julia Lemigova at the US Open. They married in New York on December 15, 2014.

1977 – Citizens United to Protect Our Children, an anti-gay organization in Portland OR, announced they had failed to get enough signatures to get a recall election of Mayor Neil Goldschmidt after he declared Portland Gay Pride Day.

1986 – The U.S. Supreme Court rules in Bowers v. Hardwick to uphold Georgia’s sodomy law which banned consensual sodomy between married and non-married people, and with it similar laws in twenty-five other states and the District of Columbia.

1990 – Three white supremacists, Robert John Winslow, Stephen Nelson, and Procter Baker, are convicted of conspiring to blow up Neighbours Disco, a gay bar in Boise, Idaho.

1990 – Former Supreme Court justice Lewis Powell declared that he believed he made a mistake by voting to uphold Georgia’s sodomy laws in the 1986 Bowers v Hardwick case.

1991 – Admiral Frank B. Kelso, chief of naval operations, announced that the explosion of the USS Iowa which killed forty-seven men had been proven not to have been caused by a wrongful intentional act and apologized to the family of Clayton Hartwig. Hartwig had been accused of intentionally causing the blast as an act of suicide following the break-up of a homosexual affair. It was not proven that he was homosexual.


Speak out, share your story, keep LGBT history alive.

Warmly,

Ronni

 

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, Lavender Effect, DataLounge.com, Arron’s Gay Info, All Things Queer, RS Levinson, Amara Das Wilhelm, Safe Schools Coalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

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