Today in LGBT History – OCTOBER 5

Musings of an Aging Lesbian

Have you ever thought about what it means to be alive? To me, being alive is being creative, being in motion, being in love. At 72, I ride my bike, go out on my boat, walk, spend time with friends, spend snuggle time with my wife, and I write my plays. To me, being alive is being engaged in the world around me so that my body and my brain still enjoy daily gifts, including just waking up and feeling grateful. Write about what it means for you to be alive and let me know.


Rudyard Kipling said: If history were taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten. The snippets of LGBTQ history here are the stories of our lives, the stories of the giants on whose shoulders we all stand. Learn about them then tell the stories and remember…

Thanks for taking this journey with me. Now go write your story!


Today in LGBT History – OCTOBER 5

1513, Panama – Spanish conquistador Vasco Nunez de Balboa discovers a community of cross-dressing males in present-day Panama and, according to reports, feeds at least 40 of them to his dogs.

1726, France – Diplomat, spy and soldier Chevalier d’Eon (5 October 1728 – 21 May 1810), who lived his first 49 years as a man and her last 33 years as a woman, is born in Tonnerre Burgundy, France. Doctors who examined d’Éon’s body after death discovered “male organs in every respect perfectly formed” but also feminine characteristics.

1840 – John Addington Symonds (5 October 1840 – 19 April 1893) is born. He is one of the earliest scholars of gay and lesbian issues. Symonds assisted Havelock Ellis in the writing of Sexual Inversion. A cultural historian, he was known for his work on the Renaissance, as well as numerous biographies of writers and artists. Although he married and had a family, he was an early advocate of male love (homosexuality) which he believed could include pederastic as well as egalitarian relationships, referring to it as l’amour de l’impossible (love of the impossible). He also wrote much poetry inspired by his homosexual affairs.

1943 –Lani Ka’ahumanu (born October 5, 1943) is a bisexual and feminist writer and activist and a frequent speaker on sexuality issue. She is the co-author of the book Bi Any Other Name. Lani serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Bisexuality.

1961 – The movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s, written by openly gay Truman Capote (September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984) and adapted for the screen by George Axelrod, opens in theaters.

1969 – The Washington Blade publishes its first issue. At that time it was called The Gay Blade and contained hard hitting journalism and gay activism.

1987 – Traverse City, Michigan, votes unanimously to repeal a law banning the sale of condoms in city limits.


1990 – Dennis Barrie, director of the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center, was acquitted of obscenity charges after displaying a Robert Mapplethorpe (November 4, 1946 – March 9, 1989) exhibit.


1998 – The U.S. Congress killed an amendment by Rep Frank Riggs (R-CA) which would have barred San Francisco from using federal housing money to implement its domestic partner ordinance.


1999 – African scholar Ali Mazrui criticizes Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni for targeting gay and lesbian citizens for harassment and arrest.


Stand up, speak out, share your story!

Warmly,

Ronni

 

(Historical information obtained from a variety of sources including QUIST at facebook.com/quistapp, Back2Stonewall.com, Lavender Effect, DataLounge.com, Arron’s Gay Info, All Things Queer, RS Levinson, Amara Das Wilhelm, out.com, Safe Schools Coalition, and/or Wikipedia. If you wish to edit an item or add an item, please send an email to me at ronnisanlo@gmail.com. Thanks!)

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